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About the tool

The tool above has three 'dashboards' to look at the data in different ways. The first two show movement of students between their home and study and their study and employment locations. The third dashboard gives a summary of the mobility of students by the local enterprise partnership (LEP) or region they grew up in.

Dashboard 1

Choose an LEP and a subject of study. Then choose a ‘flow’. This can be:

  • where students growing up in the selected LEP went to study, or
  • where the students studying in that LEP grew up.

Dashboard 2

Choose an LEP and a subject of study. Then choose a ‘flow’. This can be:

  • where students studying in the selected LEP found employment, or
  • where graduates employed there had previously studied.

Dashboard 3

Choose an LEP or a region. Then choose the specific area you are interested in.

For this selected area, you can seen how many and what proportion of students followed four different pathways:

  • stayed in their home area for study and work
  • left their home area for both study and work
  • stayed in their home area for study then left for employment
  • left their home area for study then returned for work.

A national average is presented alongside the local data.  

FAQs

Question 1: Why is data from this LEP suppressed?

Data is suppressed for student numbers less than 10. Two different types of suppression take place.

If, for a particular flow, the total number that either stays in the LEP or leaves the LEP is less than 10, then the numbers on both the map and the table will be supressed. However, the percentages will be shown.

If both totals, of those who left and stayed for the selected LEP, are above 10, but fewer than 10 students move from this LEP to another LEP, then both the numbers and the percentages will be suppressed.

Question 2: Is it fair for me to compare data from two LEPS?

If you want to make direct comparisons of the student mobility outcomes between LEPs then some considerations should be taken into account.

Many factors completely unrelated to the HE provided in an LEP can have an impact on the number of students who grew up, studied and were employed in that LEP, and hence on the final mobility outcome of that LEP.

These factors include:

  • variance in the student demographics of the LEP, and its effect on the mobility of students
  • variance in job opportunities depending on the economic and industrial profile of the LEP
  • variance in the size of LEPs. For example, the South East and North Eastern LEPs are a lot larger than others (such as Buckinghamshire Thames Valley).

Question 3: How can I work out the net flow into an LEP?

For the first dashboard, choose the flow between home and study locations, take the total number of students who grew up in the LEP and take away the total number of students who studied in the LEP.

For example, 101,950 students were studying in the Greater Manchester LEP compared with 95,790 students who grew up there. Therefore the net flow into Greater Manchester was 6,160. Similarly, to find the net flow between the study and employment LEPs, take the number of students who studied in the LEP from the number of those employed there.

For example 35,250 graduates were employed in the South East LEP and 30,400 studied there. Therefore the net flow into the South East was 4,850.

Question 4: Do the first and second dashboards show the same population?

The first dashboard shows the flows between home and study LEPs. The data shows English-domiciled first degree entrants in the years 2010-11 to 2014-15 inclusive.

The second dashboard shows the flows between study and employment locations. The data shows English-domiciled first degree students who graduated in the years 2010-11 to 2014-15 inclusive.

A student could enter a first degree course in 2010-11 and graduate in 2012-13. If this student found employment and had a usable employment postcode, they would end up in both populations.

However, despite some overlap the populations will be different. Therefore, to see the employment location of students who grew up in an LEP, the third dashboard should be used.

If you have any queries regarding the data please contact Sam Spencer, email s.spencer@hefce.ac.uk or telephone 0117 931 7072.

 

Page last updated 28 September 2017