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Contents

  • Executive summary
  • Introduction
  • Data source and definition of the cohort
  • Structure of the report
  • An overview of the types of term-time accommodation
  • Living at home
  • Annex A - Population choice and contextual results
  • Annex B - Drive time model
  • Annex C - Model variable definitions
  • Annex D - Extended charts and tables – full population
  • Annex E - Extended charts and tables – model population
  • Annex F - Identification of the five nearest locations of appropriate first degree provision, and the mean drive times to these locations
  • Annex G - List of abbreviations

Executive summary

Purpose

1.   This report is concerned with the term-time accommodation of young, full-time, first degree entrants to higher education (HE) from England and Wales. Of particular interest is the proportion of entrants living at home (that is, living at their parental or guardian’s home) in their first year of study.

2.   This report examines a time series of this trend over 11 academic years, from 1996-97 to 2006-07. Further, it provides information on student and course characteristics that may potentially be associated with a student living at home.

Key points

Overview

3.   Three out of five young entrants to full-time first degree programmes in 2006-07 live in institution-maintained accommodation in their first year of study. A fifth of entrants live at home. The remaining fifth live in their own owned or rented accommodation or other types of accommodation.

Trend in proportion living at home

4.   In 1984-85, around 8 per cent of young first degree entrants were living at home. This proportion remained relatively static for each cohort of entrants up to 1990-91. During the 1990s, the proportion of entrants living at home in their first year of study rose steadily to around 20 per cent by 2000-01. The proportion levels at around 20 per cent between the years 2001-02 and 2006-07.

Factors associated with living at home

5.   Students differ from one another in a variety of ways. Different groups of students have different qualification on entry profiles for example, and differences in the range of subjects they study. These and other variables described below interact with each other in complex ways that are often difficult to interpret.

6.   The associations we observe between the rates of living at home and the following groups of students cannot be described as causation. The interaction between variables ensures that it is difficult to ascribe a difference in the rates of living at home to one particular variable as opposed to the combination of interacting variables. For the following groups we do not consider causation, simply the variable’s relationship with the proportion of students living at home in their first year of study:

  • female students are more likely to live at home in their first year of study than their male counterparts
  • students from particular ethnic groups: the likelihood of Bangladeshi and Pakistani students to live at home is higher than that among students from other ethnic groups
  • students in receipt of Disabled Students’ Allowance have a lower rate of living at home (compared to all other students not receiving this allowance)
  • students whose parents are from higher socio-economic groups are less likely to live at home in their first year of study
  • students recorded with A levels (or Scottish Highers) as their highest qualification on entry, and with a low UCAS tariff score, have higher rates of living at home than students with other entry profiles
  • those studying particular subjects: entrants to first degree programmes in education and computer science have a higher likelihood of living at home in their first year of study than entrants to other subject areas
  • those studying at institutions in Greater London are more likely to live at home in their first year of study than those studying at institutions in other regions of the UK
  • students who, prior to commencement of their first degree programme in 2006-07, were domiciled in the North East have a higher observed rate of living at home than students domiciled in other regions of the UK
  • students whose pre-course domicile was in a ward with a high higher education participation rate are less likely to live at home
  • students whose pre-course home was in close proximity to first degree provision (in an appropriate subject) have a higher rate of living at home in their first year of study.

Non-continuation into the second year of higher education

7.   By examining entrants to first degree courses in 2005-06, we can analyse whether they continue into a second year of higher education in 2006-07. We find that:

  1. Entrants living at home have the highest non-continuation rate of those for whom term-time accommodation is known, with 10 per cent not in higher education in the following year.
  2. Students living in institution-maintained accommodation have the lowest non-continuation rate (4 per cent).

Action required

8.   No action is required in response to this document.

Date: 1 June 2009

Ref: 2009/20

To: Heads of HEFCE-funded higher education institutions

Of interest to those
responsible for:

Student data, Research, Planning

Enquiries should be directed to:

Alison Brunt, tel 0117 931 7166, e-mail a.brunt@hefce.ac.uk